Ekaterina Denkova, Ph.D.

Research Asst. Professor
Assistant Director of Neuroimaging Facility

Phone:
(305) 284-8148
Locator Code:
0751

 
About

Ekaterina is interested in cognition-emotion interactions with an emphasis on real-life events. Specifically, her research interests reside in using neuroimaging techniques to examine the effects of emotional autobiographical memories on various aspects of cognition, as well as the modulation of these effects by (i) emotion regulation processes, and (ii) individual differences in personality, cognitive abilities, and affective mood.

Career

Education

2006Ph.D. Cognitive Neuropsychology Department of Psychology, University of Strasbourg
2003 Cognitive Neuropsychology Department of Psychology, University of Toulouse
2002B.A. Psychology Department of Psychology, University of Strasbourg

Professional Experience

2018 - Research Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Miami
2017 - 2018Research Scientist, Jha Lab, Department of Psychology, University of Miami
2014 - 2017Postdoctoral Research Associate, Jha Lab, Department of Psychology, University of Miami
2008 - 2010Postdoctoral Research Associate, Dolcos Lab, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta
Research

The overarching goal of Dr. Denkova’s research is to understand the mechanisms underlying (i) the impact of mindfulness training and emotion regulation strategies on cognitive and affective functioning, with a particular focus on emotional memories and processes associated with them (i.e., mind wandering, future events planning), and (ii) the role of individual differences in gender, affective state, and habitual emotion regulation strategies in these processes. Brain imaging methods (fMRI, ERP) and cognitive and affective assessments in diverse populations are used to achieve these aims.

 

Dr. Denkova’s research focuses on the following topics: 

  • Emotional Autobiographical Memories and Emotion Regulation Strategies
  • Mind Wandering
  • Impact of Mindfulness Training on Cognitive and Affective Functioning