Marc Gellman

Research Professor
Emeritus Faculty


 
About

Personal Life

Marc the 'Canes fanDr. Gellman is a life-long rock and roll enthusiast having grown up during the 1960’s and listening to the sounds of The Beatles and Rolling Stones.  His musical tastes were influenced by his neighbor, Bruce Springsteen, and by attending the Woodstock Music and Art Festival held in Bethel, NY, August 1969.  It was at this festival, that as a high school student, the foundation was laid for Dr. Gellman to search for a better understanding of how drugs effect behavior and the relationship of drugs with music.  These interests have been merged together in the lectures Dr. Gellman gives as part of the UM course on The Sixties.  His lecture is entitled, “The Psychedelic Sixties: from the Hippies to the Yippies, to the Woodstock Generation.

Marc and Jill on tandum bikeDr. Gellman is also a recreational bicyclist and has participated in numerous charity bicycle events including the MS and AIDS Rides and the Dolphin Cancer (Cycling) Challenge, raising funds for the UM Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.  Dr. Gellman, along with his wife, Dr. Jill Turner, ride a custom-built tandem bicycle that they have toured many parts of the world on.

Career

Professional Life

Dr. Gellman retired from working full-time in 2022, with the designation of Research Professor Emeritus, after a long career at the University of Miami (UM). After over 50-years at UM he considers himself a Hurricane lifer, having started his academic career as an undergraduate at the University of Miami in 1970, a year after he spent a transformative experience attending the Woodstock Music and Art Festival. He entered his freshman year with a major in Psychology and minors in Biology and Chemistry.

Following completion of his undergraduate degree in 1974 he decided to take a few years away from academia to travel and ponder his career goals. Dr. Gellman returned to UM for graduate school in the Psychology Department, initially conducting animal research into an understanding of how the central nervous (the brain) controls the cardiovascular system (heart rate and blood pressure) for his Master’s degree.  This led to his first publication in the Journal of the Autonomic Nervous System 1.  He decided for his doctoral research to explore the new field of behavioral medicine, combining with interests in psychophysiology and psychopharmacology. This marked the start of his career exploring the effects of stress on the cardiovascular system. During the early 1980’s he commenced to be trained in conducting human research through an assistantship with the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at UM, and taking courses at the UM Medical School through the Department of Pharmacology, all combining his interests in psychology and pharmacology.

While still in graduate school, and with his background in psychology and pharmacology he began teaching an undergraduate course in the Psychology Department on Drugs and Behavior (PSY 320).  Dr. Gellman considers his 40-year run teaching the “Drugs and Behavior” course to be one of my proudest achievements. Interacting with the UM undergraduate students provided him with a sense of purpose and joy.

Combining his experience in teaching the Drugs and Behavior course, along with his experience attending Woodstock led him to participate in the interdisciplinary course, “The Sixties,” which was developed by Dr. Zack Bowen from the Department of English and Dr. Donald Spivey from the Department of History. This course has been taught at UM for the past 20 years. One of Dr. Gellman’s fondest memories at the University, iss being part of this course.

Dr. Gellman received his first research grant from a pharmaceutical company that manufactured the leading drug for treating hypertension (Inderal).  The company was exploring new uses for the drug and funded Dr. Gellman to explore its effectiveness in reducing stress.  This became the bases for his doctoral work, and he completed his Ph.D. in 1984.  This research led to publications on blood pressure regulation 2, 3.  Following a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine from the National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Gellman joined the faculty of the Department of Psychology in 1986.

Photo of Encylopedia of Behavioral MedicineHe continued his interest in the field of behavioral medicine by becoming involved in academic organizations, initially serving on various national committees, which led to becoming a member of the Board of Directors for both the Society of Behavioral Medicine and the International Society of Behavioral Medicine. Through professional contacts he attained with these two organizations he was asked to serve as Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine 4.  The first edition, a 4-volume major reference work, was published in 2013. Due to its success a second edition was published 2020 5.

  1. Gellman, M.D., Schneiderman, N., Wallach, J.H., and LeBlanc, W. (1981).  Cardiovascular responses elicited by hypothalamic stimulation in rabbits reveal a medio-lateral organization.  Journal of the Autonomic Nervous System, 4, 301-317. https://ac.els-cdn.com/0165183881900345/1-s2.0-0165183881900345-main.pdf?_tid=4924dc6d-d4b7-419b-97ec-0143f242a37d&acdnat=1541775229_9f5d56d8c4a32ab1a9771c1b51f908d3
  2. Ironson, G. H., Gellman, M. D., Spitzer, S. B., Llabre, M. M., DeCarlo-Pasin, R., Weidler, D. J., & Schneiderman, N. (1989).  Predicting home and work blood pressure measurements from resting baselines and laboratory reactivity in black and white Americans.  Psychophysiology, 26, 174-184. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8986.1989.tb03151.x
  3. Gellman, M.D., Spitzer, S.B., Ironson, G.H., Llabre, M.M., Saab, P., DeCarlo-Pasin, R., Weidler, D.J., & Schneiderman, N. (1990).  Posture, place and mood effects on ambulatory blood pressure.  Psychophysiology, 27, 544-551. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8986.1990.tb01972.x
  4. Gellman, M.D. and Turner, J.R. (2013). Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer Science + Business Media: New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9.ISBN 978-1-4419-1004-2 (Print). ISBN 978-1-4419-1005-9 (eBook).
  5. Gellman, M.D. (2020) Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. 2nd edition: Springer Nature Switzerland AG https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-39903-0
    ISBN 978-3-030-39901-6 ISBN 978-3-030-39903-0 (eBook)
    ISBN 978-3-030-39902-3 (print and electronic bundle)

 

Professional Life

Dr. Gellman retired from working full-time in 2022, with the designation of Research Professor Emeritus, after a long career at the University of Miami (UM). After over 50-years at UM he considers himself a Hurricane lifer, having started his academic career as an undergraduate at the University of Miami in 1970, a year after he spent a transformative experience attending the Woodstock Music and Art Festival. He entered his freshman year with a major in Psychology and minors in Biology and Chemistry.

Following completion of his undergraduate degree in 1974 he decided to take a few years away from academia to travel and ponder his career goals. Dr. Gellman returned to UM for graduate school in the Psychology Department, initially conducting animal research into an understanding of how the central nervous (the brain) controls the cardiovascular system (heart rate and blood pressure) for his Master’s degree.  This led to his first publication in the Journal of the Autonomic Nervous System 1.  He decided for his doctoral research to explore the new field of behavioral medicine, combining with interests in psychophysiology and psychopharmacology. This marked the start of his career exploring the effects of stress on the cardiovascular system. During the early 1980’s he commenced to be trained in conducting human research through an assistantship with the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at UM, and taking courses at the UM Medical School through the Department of Pharmacology, all combining his interests in psychology and pharmacology.

While still in graduate school, and with his background in psychology and pharmacology he began teaching an undergraduate course in the Psychology Department on Drugs and Behavior (PSY 320).  Dr. Gellman considers his 40-year run teaching the “Drugs and Behavior” course to be one of my proudest achievements. Interacting with the UM undergraduate students provided him with a sense of purpose and joy.

Combining his experience in teaching the Drugs and Behavior course, along with his experience attending Woodstock led him to participate in the interdisciplinary course, “The Sixties,” which was developed by Dr. Zack Bowen from the Department of English and Dr. Donald Spivey from the Department of History. This course has been taught at UM for the past 20 years. One of Dr. Gellman’s fondest memories at the University, iss being part of this course.

Dr. Gellman received his first research grant from a pharmaceutical company that manufactured the leading drug for treating hypertension (Inderal).  The company was exploring new uses for the drug and funded Dr. Gellman to explore its effectiveness in reducing stress.  This became the bases for his doctoral work, and he completed his Ph.D. in 1984.  This research led to publications on blood pressure regulation 2, 3.  Following a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine from the National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Gellman joined the faculty of the Department of Psychology in 1986.

Photo of Encylopedia of Behavioral MedicineHe continued his interest in the field of behavioral medicine by becoming involved in academic organizations, initially serving on various national committees, which led to becoming a member of the Board of Directors for both the Society of Behavioral Medicine and the International Society of Behavioral Medicine. Through professional contacts he attained with these two organizations he was asked to serve as Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine 4.  The first edition, a 4-volume major reference work, was published in 2013. Due to its success a second edition was published 2020 5.

  1. Gellman, M.D., Schneiderman, N., Wallach, J.H., and LeBlanc, W. (1981).  Cardiovascular responses elicited by hypothalamic stimulation in rabbits reveal a medio-lateral organization.  Journal of the Autonomic Nervous System, 4, 301-317. https://ac.els-cdn.com/0165183881900345/1-s2.0-0165183881900345-main.pdf?_tid=4924dc6d-d4b7-419b-97ec-0143f242a37d&acdnat=1541775229_9f5d56d8c4a32ab1a9771c1b51f908d3
  2. Ironson, G. H., Gellman, M. D., Spitzer, S. B., Llabre, M. M., DeCarlo-Pasin, R., Weidler, D. J., & Schneiderman, N. (1989).  Predicting home and work blood pressure measurements from resting baselines and laboratory reactivity in black and white Americans.  Psychophysiology, 26, 174-184. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8986.1989.tb03151.x
  3. Gellman, M.D., Spitzer, S.B., Ironson, G.H., Llabre, M.M., Saab, P., DeCarlo-Pasin, R., Weidler, D.J., & Schneiderman, N. (1990).  Posture, place and mood effects on ambulatory blood pressure.  Psychophysiology, 27, 544-551. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8986.1990.tb01972.x
  4. Gellman, M.D. and Turner, J.R. (2013). Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer Science + Business Media: New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9.ISBN 978-1-4419-1004-2 (Print). ISBN 978-1-4419-1005-9 (eBook).
  5. Gellman, M.D. (2020) Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. 2nd edition: Springer Nature Switzerland AG https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-39903-0
    ISBN 978-3-030-39901-6 ISBN 978-3-030-39903-0 (eBook)
    ISBN 978-3-030-39902-3 (print and electronic bundle)